Training School 2017 – Treatment pathways and aftercare for forensic psychiatric patients

What is the training school about?

Forensic patients can get stuck in the system due to patient characteristics, quality of treatment but also the quality and availability of facilities with a lower level of security and/or aftercare. The focus will be on the quality and availability of facilities with a lower level of security and/or aftercare, the transitions between systems and the boundaries and problems of these transitions will be connected to the aims of the Action.

Models of aftercare will be discussed. The mechanisms behind pathways and aftercare will be analysed. The theory of ‘recovery’ and the ‘Good Lives Model’ approach will be presented and connected to the aim of this training school; both models will be integrated in the Risk Needs Responsivity-principles of forensic psychiatric care.

Different countries will have different strengths and weaknesses in their treatment pathways and aftercare. Based on specific SWOT analysis of the system characteristics of the participating countries, a guided discussion will result in specific issues, opportunities, best practices, legislation and threats on the patient’s progress through the specific stages of treatment and aftercare.

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Long-Term Suicide Risk in Forensic Psychiatric Patients

Based on the article Long-Term Suicide Risk in Forensic Psychiatric Patients by Clarke, M., Davies, S., Clive, H. & Duggan, C. (2011) in Archives of Suicide Research, 15: 1, 16 — 28

It is often said that psychiatric patients are a greater risk to themselves than others; while this may be true for general samples, the risk that patient treated in Forensic Psychiatric Units present to themselves, rather than to others, which by the nature of the sample is high, had not been a focus for study. Clarke et al. (2011) investigated the long-term suicide risk in forensic psychiatric patients. They performed a retrospective study, which considered the mortality outcomes of a cohort of 595 former patients of a medium secure unit in Leicester, England. Patients were admitted during the 20-year period between 1983 and 2003. The study found an increased risk of mortality in former forensic patients, from all causes, and particularly from suicide.

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